CLG

Want to Achieve Superior Turnaround Performance? Forming a Turnaround Steering Team is Your First Step

By: Charles Carnes, Senior Partner; Brian Cole, Principal; Krystyna Riley, Senior Consultant

A high performing Turnaround Steering Team is your key to better planning and execution

Turnarounds are a complex, challenging, and expensive part of capital intensive industries (e.g., refining, mining, power generation). Successful turnarounds require significant collaboration and alignment between operations, maintenance, and engineering to ensure best-in-class performance.

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Kick Your Culture of Innovation into High Gear: A Generational Approach

Have you heard about Adobe’s Kickbox? It’s a little red box filled with materials that take employees through a six-step, self-guided innovation process. Employees who have a new idea they want to pursue take a workshop and then proceed through the stages of innovation on their own. Each box contains a credit card with $1000 in seed money.

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How Important Are Generational Differences, Really?

Companies pay millions each year to researchers and consultants to help them understand employees in various generational cohorts. Yet some observers have begun to ask whether companies are going too far, and whether generational divisions are overblown, if they exist at all (see New York Times article Oh, to Be Young, Millennial, and So Wanted by Marketers)

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The Toughest Job You’ll Ever Love

Do you remember that line, from a 1978 public service announcement encouraging viewers to join the Peace Corps? (Hint – “It’s the toughest job you’ll ever love”)  Well, it seems like it might also readily apply to the CEO job. Our survey of executives found that being CEO was much tougher than our executives ever imagined, but also much more rewarding.
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Breaking Out of the CEO Bubble

Do you regularly seek out information from people across your organization? Do you maintain a cabinet of trusted advisors—confidents who are willing tell you not only the good but also the difficult truth when appropriate? Do you look closely at behaviors of your own that may prevent others from speaking openly with you?
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Living the Public Life: Are You ready?

If you hope to become CEO, you can’t be a wallflower. A key part of any CEOs job is to represent their organization to diverse audiences, including analysts and investors, the media, members of the local community, government officials and even heads of state.
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Building Your Kitchen Cabinet: Ten Critical Steps to Winning Over Your Board

The Board of Directors is a primary stakeholder group for any CEO. When CEOs enjoy strong relationships with their Boards and individual Board members, they can generally make swifter progress. On the other hand, when relationships between CEOs and their Boards become strained, CEOs find all kinds of roadblocks cropping up.
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The Leadership Team You Inherit

Joining an organization from outside and inheriting an intact senior team, possibly containing members who had been passed over for the CEO job, brings obvious challenges. CEOs in our study who had lived through this situation reported that it was important to build their own credibility with the team while also assessing the strengths and weaknesses of their new colleagues. “One thing I knew I had to do quickly,” one CEO told us, “and I felt prepared to do, was to build trust and confidence in me. I had to do this with my management team, and I had to do it with the other stakeholders, including the Board and with our customers.”
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From Peer to Boss—Mastering the Transition

You’ve been working toward the top spot for years. Now that you are the CEO, you have to lead your former colleagues, even some who might not be all that thrilled at the prospect. What do you do?
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Memo to New CEOs: Pick A Winning Senior Team

As a new CEO, you can’t do it all alone. While you might have the authority to make the company’s strategic decisions, you will never have all the information you need to make them nor the time required to implement them. That’s why one of your first jobs should be to select your senior team—and to do it well. As one participant in our CEO study observed, “You can never have too good of a team. Upgrading the talent makes a magnitude of change in the organization. You probably never have a team as good as you think you have, and you can always improve your team.”
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